AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Professional (#270)

A 3-tier e-commerce web application is current deployed on-premises and will be migrated to AWS for greater scalability and elasticity. The web server currently shares read-only data using a network distributed file system. The app server tier uses a clustering mechanism for discovery and shared session state that depends on IP multicast. The database tier uses shared-storage clustering to provide database fall over capability, and uses several read slaves for scaling. Data on all servers and the distributed file system directory is backed up weekly to off-site tapes. Which AWS storage and database architecture meets the requirements of the application?

Web servers: store read-only data in S3, and copy from S3 to root volume at boot time. App servers: share state using a combination of DynamoDB and IP unicast. Database: use RDS with multi-AZ deployment and one or more read replicas. Backup: web servers, app servers, and database backed up weekly to Glacier using snapshots.
Web servers: store read-only data in an EC2 NFS server; mount to each web server at boot time. App servers: share state using a combination of DynamoDB and IP multicast. Database: use RDS with multi-AZ deployment and one or more Read Replicas. Backup: web and app servers backed up weekly via AMIs, database backed up via DB snapshots.
Web servers: store read-only data in S3, and copy from S3 to root volume at boot time. App servers: share state using a combination of DynamoDB and IP unicast. Database: use RDS with multi-AZ deployment and one or more Read Replicas. Backup: web and app servers backed up weekly via AMIs, database backed up via DB snapshots.
Web servers: store read-only data in S3, and copy from S3 to root volume at boot time. App servers: share state using a combination of DynamoDB and IP unicast. Database: use RDS with multi-AZ deployment. Backup: web and app servers backed up weekly via AMIs, database backed up via DB snapshots.